When Chrysler Group LLC filed for the trademark “Scat Pack” on August 30, 2013, social media lit up with excitement and automotive magazines surmised at what Chrysler’s intent for the trademark was going to be.

It wasn’t long before the world learned exactly what Chrysler was planning, when they unveiled the new Scat Pack equipped Dodge Challenger at the SEMA convention in Las Vegas, NV, on November 5, 2013.

And while the trademark application for “Scat Pack” states that Chrysler intends on using the trademark for “passenger automobiles, their structural parts, trim and badges,” one can assume that the Scat Pack Club, from years past, would also be dusted off and revived to match R/T owners with what SRT owners have in their brand, an exclusive club.

On October 11, 2013, The Patent & Trademark Office sent Chrysler a non-final letter declaring that the trademark “Scat Pack” is too similar to the trademark “Scat” and that confusion in the marketplace is likely. Consequently, the Patent & Trademark Office has put Chrysler on notice that, absent some compelling authority or circumstance, the trademark registration for “Scat Pack” is not likely going to be granted.

Chrysler now has six months in which to respond to the Patent & Trademark Office’s letter, else the trademark application will be denied and “Scat Pack” considered a dead mark.

This comes as another blow to Chrysler, who had let many of their popular trademarks expire or failed to even register some names altogether. A few years back, Chrysler had tried to trademark the word “Cuda,” a name that is recognized throughout the world for the muscle car that once bore its name. While the Cuda line of vehicles was short lived, the name Cuda was all but forgotten and left to pass into history. During that time, along comes All American Racing, who developed a specialty Cuda named the AAR Cuda and then trademarks the name. When Chrysler returned decades later and attempted to trademark the Cuda name, the Patent & Trademark Office denied Chrysler’s trademark application, much like Scat Pack, because the name would likely cause confusion in the marketplace. Chrysler then sought to strip AAR Cuda of the name and have since failed, but the parties continue to litigate the matter. Chrysler was apparently planning on releasing a new Cuda vehicle which many speculated was to be a redesigned Dodge Challenger. Whatever their plans were for the Cuda name, Ralph Gilles has gone on record as saying the Cuda is all but dead for now.

Even the name “Scat Pack Club” has problems for Chrysler, as this club, itself, has been openly using the name since 2009 and even went so far as to secure the domain name in 2010. And this, only after many within Chrysler refused to revive the Scat Pack Club when repeatedly asked to do so.

Undaunted, on November 4, 2013, Chrysler filed for trademark protection of the Scat Pack bee, i.e., “bee with a motor vehicle engine showing on the side of the bee and tires on the underside of the bee.” for the purpose of badges and t-shirts.

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